Entering an SSH password

Here we will attempt to SSH into a server and enter a password programmatically.

Note

It is recommended that you just ssh-copy-id to copy your public key to the server so you don’t need to enter your password, but for the purposes of this demonstration, we try to enter a password.

To interact with a process, we need to assign a callback to STDOUT. The callback signature we’ll use will take a queue.Queue object for the second argument, and we’ll use that to send STDIN back to the process.

Here’s our first attempt:

from sh import ssh

def ssh_interact(line, stdin):
    line = line.strip()
    print(line)
    if line.endswith("password:"):
        stdin.put("correcthorsebatterystaple")

ssh("10.10.10.100", _out=ssh_interact)

If you run this (substituting an IP that you can SSH to), you’ll notice that nothing is printed from within the callback. The problem has to do with STDOUT buffering. By default, sh line-buffers STDOUT, which means that ssh_interact will only receive output when sh encounters a newline in the output. This is a problem because the password prompt has no newline:

amoffat@10.10.10.100's password:

Because a newline is never encountered, nothing is sent to the ssh_interact callback. So we need to change the STDOUT buffering. We do this with the _out_bufsize special kwarg. We’ll set it to 0 for unbuffered output:

from sh import ssh

def ssh_interact(line, stdin):
    line = line.strip()
    print(line)
    if line.endswith("password:"):
        stdin.put("correcthorsebatterystaple")

ssh("10.10.10.100", _out=ssh_interact, _out_bufsize=0)

If you run this updated version, you’ll notice a new problem. The output looks like this:

a
m
o
f
f
a
t
@
1
0
.
1
0
.
1
0
.
1
0
0
'
s

p
a
s
s
w
o
r
d
:

This is because the chunks of STDOUT our callback is receiving are unbuffered, and are therefore individual characters, instead of entire lines. What we need to do now is aggregate this character-by-character data into something more meaningful for us to test if the pattern password: has been sent, signifying that SSH is ready for input.

It would make sense to encapsulate the variable we’ll use for aggregating into some kind of closure or class, but to keep it simple, we’ll just use a global:

from sh import ssh
import sys

aggregated = ""
def ssh_interact(char, stdin):
    global aggregated
    sys.stdout.write(char.encode())
sys.stdout.flush()
    aggregated += char
    if aggregated.endswith("password: "):
        stdin.put("correcthorsebatterystaple")

ssh("10.10.10.100", _out=ssh_interact, _out_bufsize=0)

You’ll also notice that the example still doesn’t work. There are two problems: The first is that your password must end with a newline, as if you had typed it and hit the return key. This is because SSH has no idea how long your password is, and is line-buffering STDIN.

The second problem lies deeper in SSH. SSH needs a TTY attached to its STDIN in order to work properly. This tricks SSH into believing that it is interacting with a real user in a real terminal session. To enable TTY, we can add the _tty_in special kwarg:

from sh import ssh
import sys

aggregated = ""
def ssh_interact(char, stdin):
    global aggregated
    sys.stdout.write(char.encode())
sys.stdout.flush()
    aggregated += char
    if aggregated.endswith("password: "):
        stdin.put("correcthorsebatterystaple\n")

ssh("10.10.10.100", _out=ssh_interact, _out_bufsize=0, _tty_in=True)

And now our remote login script works!

amoffat@10.10.10.100's password:
Linux 10.10.10.100 testhost #1 SMP Tue Jun 21 10:29:24 EDT 2011 i686 GNU/Linux
Ubuntu 10.04.2 LTS

Welcome to Ubuntu!
 * Documentation:  https://help.ubuntu.com/

66 packages can be updated.
53 updates are security updates.

Ubuntu 10.04.2 LTS

Welcome to Ubuntu!
 * Documentation:  https://help.ubuntu.com/
You have new mail.
Last login: Thu Sep 13 03:53:00 2012 from some.ip.address
amoffat@10.10.10.100:~$

How you should REALLY be using SSH

Many people want to learn how to enter an SSH password by script because they want to execute remote commands on a server. Instead of trying to log in through SSH and then sending terminal input of the command to run, let’s see how we can do it another way.

First, open a terminal and run ssh-copy-id yourservername. You’ll be asked to enter your password for the server. After entering your password, you’ll be able to SSH into the server without needing a password again. This simplifies things greatly for sh.

The second thing we want to do is use SSH’s ability to pass a command to run to the server you’re SSHing to. Here’s how you can run ifconfig on a server without having to use that server’s shell directly:

ssh amoffat@10.10.10.100 ifconfig

Translating this to sh, it becomes:

import sh

print(sh.ssh("amoffat@10.10.10.100", "ifconfig"))

We can make this even nicer by taking advantage of sh’s Baking to bind our server username/ip to a command object:

import sh

my_server = sh.ssh.bake("amoffat@10.10.10.100")
print(my_server("ifconfig"))
print(my_server("whoami"))

Now we have a reusable command object that we can use to call remote commands. But there is room for one more improvement. We can also use sh’s Sub-commands feature which expands attribute access into command arguments:

import sh

my_server = sh.ssh.bake("amoffat@10.10.10.100")
print(my_server.ifconfig())
print(my_server.whoami())